Achooo! God Bless You

Today I just want to share my result of long-occupied curiousity. As my title stated, it’s about sneeze. One simple question. Why people say God Bless You after hearing people sneeze? Why on earth do you do that?

Sneeze is a way to let something out of your nose and mouth, caused by irritation due to the mucus membrane in the nose or throat. Fun Facts : Sneeze can travel up to 100 miles per hour. And it can transmit diseases too. But is this the cause of why people say “God Bless You” after they heard sneezing?

To understand why, we have to get back in time. The term “God Bless You” is believed coming from Pope Gregory I. At the time he was a Pope, the epidemic of Bubonic Plague reaches Rome. Sneeze is one of the early symptoms of the disease. So, He found a way to put a stop to it, by saying the magic word. Some people say your heart will stop beating when you sneeze. Bless you is a way to ensure the return of life and makes sure that heart will continue beating. Though when I search for it, a website says the frequency of a heart beat alters, but it doesn’t stop.

Another version of this stated that when you sneeze, you actually pull your soul out. And it increases the risk of evil spirit to come into. And thus, we say “God Bless You” to protect the sneezers from the evil. This version is a bit scary, though.

Sneeze is also associated with things in a particular culture. One of them is Asian Culture. In Asia, including my country, when you sneeze it means someone is talking about you.

And thus problem solved. Now I know why people say the magic word, after the sneeze.

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